Terranora, New South Wales in the 1930’s

terranoraBlog2We were searching through our vast catalogue of found photos when this caught our eye. Maude, Jack and George in Terranora, New South Wales in, we think, the early 1930’s. The photo album is mainly about Camberwell, London and holidays in Eastbourne but half way through the images of  George and his wife Beatie start to appear with the caption ‘Australian Pioneers’. The pictures have evocative scribbles underneath – Brisbane River at Lone Pine THIS IS 6 MILES AWAY says one. Our curiosity piqued we spent a happy 20 minutes touring the streets of Terranora, courtesy of Google Earth, and very beautiful it looks, although we have no doubt life was harsh for early pioneers in the 1930’s.

The photo album continues with its dual narrative of England and Australia to  the final images which show an English  grave and next to it  a photo of the family in Australia, the young girl in the photos above now in her 20’s in  front of an early 50’s bungalow laughing and smiling.

We won’t try to make sense of it – that’s what we love about found photo albums – a hundred possible narratives just ready to be created and explored.

About TheBigForest

We are TheBigForest. Two silly artist makers creating in felt and paper construction. Like us on Facebook: TheBigForest. Find us at Twitter : twitter/TheBigForestuk

7 comments

  1. I always feel sad when I see old photo albums in second-hand or charity shops; lost lives, unloved … so nice to think that people like you give them a new lease of life. (I would like to but I already have ‘hoarder’ issues in a tiny flat!)

    • Brace up! No sadness on TheBigForest blog please!

      Joking aside, we are running out of space for ‘treasures’ too but they inspire our work so we cant have one without the other! Ill post the papercut tableau we have been making that feature some found photo people soon. I dont think people value enough old photographs as social documents particularly those that show casual interiors or domestic gardens etc.

  2. Its kind of sad too really… I cherish my photos and deeply regret not asking family members no longer with me the stories behind the pictures . They’re a little snapshot in time . I tell my grandkids all the time little stories in the hope that they will remember some and share them with their kids. Maybe its just a way of ensuring my immortality 🙂 or maybe its just my age !! I love your blog !

    • Some one once said to me that you really die when people stop talking about you. Write the stories down!

      My elderly aunt in Canada has just written her autobiography and the fascinating stuff is all the things that aren’t usually recorded, their experiences of emmigration to Canada in the 1960’s for example. My great great grandmother kept a scap book, its the snippets of stories that make it come alive. Your stories will be interesting reading for them in years to come so do record them.

  3. Awesome–I love old photos, even when I don’t know the people. Just love imagining their stories!

    • Yes it is the stories that inspire. Some snapshots are beautiful too as photographic images in a very un-posed, un thinking way. I have a beautiful snapshot of people on the deck of a boat, windblown and laughing. It has the feeling of a Norman Parkinson fashion shot although its taken in the 1920’s. I must find it and post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: